Survival of human intestinal parasites in experimentally Infected Laboratory animals in Orlu South Eastern Nigeria

Survival of human intestinal parasites in experimentally Infected Laboratory animals in Orlu South Eastern Nigeria

Immaculata O. Uduchi1 Okolie Nnaemeka J. C2 Ambrose U. Opara2 and Jacinta  C. Elo – Ilo3 

  1. Department of Medical Microbiology Imo State University Teaching Hospital Orlu Nigeria
  2. Department of Medical Laboratory Science Imo State University Owerri Nigeria
  3. Department of Paediatrics Nnamdi Azikiwe University Nnewi Campus Anambra State Nigeria

 

Abstract:The survival of   human intestinal parasites in experimentally infected Laboratory animals was studied in Orlu South Eastern Nigeria. A total of 250 male and female patients aged 18-50 years and presenting with gastroenteritis and abdominal discomfort were selected for the study. Out of this number 20 declined and 230 participated in the study. They were given questionnaires to complete and specimen containers to produce stool samples. Laboratory examination showed that out of 230 male and female patients 157(68.26%) were infected with intestinal parasites.  Fifty five (2.90%) were infected with Necator americanus 32(1.90%) were infected with Ascaris lumbricoides 20(8.69%) were infected with Taenia species 7(3.04%) were infected with Trichuris trichiura 4(1.74%) were infected with Hymenolepsis nana 25(10.87%) were infected with Entamoeba histolytica and 14(6.09%) were infected with Trichomonas hominis. The most prevalent intestinal parasite in Orlu is Necator americanus (2.90%) while the least prevalent intestinal parasite is Hymenolepsis nana (1.74%). The prevalence of intestinal helminthes 118(51.3%) was higher than that of intestinal protozoa 39(17%). Age – related prevalence of infection showed that infection decreases as age of patients increased. The highest prevalence of infection 8.78% was amongst patients aged 18– 25 years while the least 50% was amongst patients aged 41 to 50 years. Sex – related prevalence of infection showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) in the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections between male and female patients. A total of 400 male and female Wistar strain of Rattus albus aged 2-3months and weighing between 80– 180g were used for the study. They were purchased from accredited animal house at Emii Veterinary Farm Owerri Imo State Nigeria. The animals were quarantined in a separate compartment shelves netted with barbwire in the animal house of Faculty of Medicine Imo State University Orlu Campus.  Out of 32 uninfected laboratory animals experimentally infected with different human intestinal parasites (Ascaris lumbricoides Necator americanus Trichuris trichuira Hymenolepsis nana Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas hominis) 34(10.6%) died. A total of 288(89.4%) survived (table 6). Analysis of their stool samples showed presence of ova cysts and trophozoites of the inoculated parasites. This study has shown that human intestinal parasites can survive and infect laboratory animals such as Rattus albus making it possible for such animals to be used for in vivo studies involving human intestinal parasites.

Download: Immaculata O. Uduchi et al SPJPBS.2017. 5(1)041-051